Archive for the ‘kerneveureg’ Category

Ar c’herneveureg, yezh-c’hoar ar brezhoneg – Radio Kerne: Ar c’herneveureg, yezh-c’hoar ar brezhoneg.

Cornwall podkast « A’ whye wor kewsel kernewek ? » Komz a rit kerneveureg ? Hiziv an deiz e vez kavet ur mil den bennak gouest d’ober gant ar c’herneveureg, yezh geltiek Kerne Veur a zo bet adsavet e-kerzh an XIXvet kantved. Koulskoude ne oa ket mat ar jeu eviti a-raok, dre ma oa aet da goll er bloavezhioù 1700. Bet eo bet Benjamin oc’h atersiñ Ronan Trémel a ra war-dro kentelioù kerneveureg e Kallag. Ul levr evit deskiñ e-unan a oa bet embannet ivez gant Ken George : Holyewgh an Lergh.

An nice Cornish translation here of Me zo ganet e kreiz ar mor (I was born within the sea / among the waves) original written by  Jean-Pierre Calloc’h

The Breton original can be heard sung here below.
This months edition of the Breton magazine Bremañ (Now) has three articles about Cornwall and the Cornish. Here you will find the opening editorial from Bremañ and its English translation. You can find Bremañ on Facebook here

It is with Skol an Emsav, who produce Bremañ, that I started to study the Breton language in any seriousness. Many thanks to them and their team.

Kernev-Veur… Un tamm douar en tu all da Vor Breizh. E Stad Breizh-Veur. Ha ni, e Stad Frañs. Gwallzarvoudoù an Istor… Petra ’reoc’h? 

Mat eo lavaret hag adlavaret ez eo Kernev-Veur ar vroad tostañ dimp e pep keñver. N’eus ket da glask pemp troad d’ar maout. Aze emañ hor breudeur hag hor c’hoarezed nesañ. Gwir eo e sellomp aesoc’h hag aliesoc’h ouzh Kembre. Bev ar yezh du-hont. Aes a-walc’h tapout tammoù kembraeg en ur gevredigezh ma c’haller c’hoazh kembraegañ e-mesk an dud. Met Kernev-Veur eo ar vro dostañ dimp e pep keñver. N’eo ket ar c’herneveureg pempvet rannyezh ar brezhoneg. Diskouezet eo bet splann gant Ken George. Ar yezh predenek tostañ dimp ez eo avat ha diarvar eo kement-se. 
Trawalc’h e vefe kement-se evit ma vefe gwir genlabour etre Breizhiz ha Kerneveuriz evit lakaat tostaat an div yezh predenek. Ha pelloc’h c’hoazh, perak chom hep hunvreal? Lakaat an teir yezh predenek da dostaat en-dro, war dachenn an ezhommoù nevez? En hon dalc’h emañ kement-se, penn-da-benn. Ober a reomp bremañ, ken aes ha tra, gant ar ger “kleweled”. Piv a oar ez eo ar ger kembraek clyweled? N’eus forzh, graet en deus e dreuz. Peogwir e oa da vezañ evel-se. Adkavout a reer ar memes ger e kerneveureg evit an anv-gwan klywwelyek. Ur skouer hag a vefe brav heuliañ en dazont, pa gaver ar memes gwriziennoù en teir yezh. Pep hini eus an teir yezh predenek he deus traoù da reiñ d’an div all. 
 Embannet e Bremañ Du 2014, niv.397. 
“Dyski kernewek nyns yw pur gales!” da lavaret eo: “deskiñ kernewek nend eo peur galet” pe “deskiñ kerneveureg n’eo ket diaes-tre.”

In the English translation that follows I have tried my best to stay as close as possible to the Breton so that it will be easier for Cornish speakers to compare the two languages. This results in English that may seem a little unusual or clumsy at times, but it provides a better idea of how things are expressed in Breton. Please do feel free to suggest changes or corrections. I would be most grateful of the help. 

Cornwall a stretch of land on the other side of the British Sea [the Channel]. Inside Great Britain. And us [Breton’s] inside the French state. The mishaps of history. What to do? 
It is good to say and say again that Cornwall is the nation closest to us in all ways. No need looking for five legs on a ram (in looking for complications). Over there are our closest brothers and sisters. It is true that we look to Wales with greater facility, and more often. The language is alive there. It’s easy enough to pick up bits of Welsh in a society where one can still speak the language amongst the people. However, Cornwall is the country closest to us in all ways. Cornish is not the fifth dialect of Breton. This has been clearly demonstrated by Ken George. The closest brythonic language to ours, it is however, without risk (without doubt).

That should be enough for there to be a true collaboration between the Bretons and the Cornish to draw together these two brythonic languages. And why not dream of going further? Why not draw the three brythonic languages together again with regards to modern needs? All this is completely in our hands. We use the word kleweled [audiovisual] with no great difficulty. Who knows that there is a Welsh word clyweled? Anyway, this word has gone the distance (been accepted). Because it was to be that way. We find the same word in Cornish klywwelyek as the adjective. An example that would be great to follow in the future when we  find the same root-words in all three languages. Each of the three brythonic languages has something to offer to the two others.

Publish in Bremañ November 2014, No 397

“Dyski kernewek nyns yw pur gales!” that is to say: “deskiñ kernewek nend eo peur galet [learning Cornish is not too hard]” or “deskiñ kerneveureg n’eo ket diaes-tre [learning Cornish is not very difficult].”


This is a great acquisition being as it is a book full of Celtic mythological beings and the first in a tri-lingual format – Welsh, Breton and Cornish. A book for young and old alike in a large A4 format. At just £2.95 it’s a bargain! Available from Agan Tavas ray@agantavas.org
 
Not read it yet but soon will.