Archive for the ‘celtic league’ Category

A highly successful rally occurred in Truro during Saturday 6th June, 2015 bringing together people from all parts of the community who share a common concern, notably the horrific effects the Tory Government’s cutbacks are having on our community here in Cornwall.
Assembled in Hendra Park, speaker after speaker, many with employment in the health, education and other essential public services took to the stage and spoke out publicly about their concerns. Doctors, nurses, teachers, youth workers, college lecturers, Council employees and many Councillors themselves expressed real fears for the future.
Although not organised by the Kernow Branch of the Celtic League, it was heartening to see so many Branch members there and all playing a key role in the organisation of the event which was attended by several hundred people.
Cornwall is being hit extremely hard by the austerity measures being utilised by the Westminster Government in order to attempt to pay for the massive mismanagement of the world’s various economies by the bankers. Sharing the invidious title of the poorest part of Britain along with our brother and sisters in the Welsh valleys, Cornwall continues to be one of the most impoverished parts of Europe despite decades of false promises of wealth supposedly to be generated by the false hope tourism.
The words of the late and much missed David Penhaligon, possibly one of Cornwall’s greatest MPs come to mind: ‘You need more in an economy than just tourism, ice cream and deckchairs. Our mining industry is not a figment of the last decade or the last two decades. It has occupied Cornishmen and it has produced wealth for this century, the previous century and probably the last two thousand years; and what we’re asking the government to do is to recognise the great contribution we have made for the wealth of Britain, and in this time of great trial and tribulation to come to our assistance – that’s what we’re asking our government to do.’
Taxes and money paid and created in the Duchy is quite simply haemorrhaging across the Tamar and back towards London and the so called ‘Home counties’.
Cornwall receives back far less than it pays out. Now, we have the second highest rate of homelessness in Britain and the people of Cornwall, an area where basic pay and zero hour contracts flourish even amongst health professionals, receive considerably less in public service expenditure such as health and education than elsewhere.
Members of the Kernow Branch have been at the forefront of a campaign calling for the people of Cornwall to be treated less as second class citizens and more equally with people living elsewhere.
The Convener of the Branch has today written to Cornwall’s MPs and MEPs with the following message following the Truro rally:
‘During this time when MPs have seen fit to award themselves a 10% pay rise, that rise more than some people in Cornwall earn, when the Royal Household receives 15% of the profits of the £9.9 billion Crown Estate which is managed on behalf of the monarch resulting in the Sovereign Grant rising from £31 million in 2012-13 to £40 million in the current financial year -an increase of 29% in three years, we are heartily sickened with living on the crumbs cast from the Westminster table. We demand a seat at the table.Scrape away the wealthy and second holiday home owners whose votes skew those of the indigenous populations and witness the reality of food bank Cornwall. Your heads should hang in shame.’
Many were shocked to see Cornwall ‘turn blue’ during the recent Westminster General Election. That said, and as many speakers pointed out at the Hendra rally, over 70% of people did not vote for this current government.
And now, as has occurred many times in Cornwall’s often hidden history, the fight for what is rightfully ours has again started.
The Kernow Branch is encouraging as many people as possible to take this fight, albeit a peaceful and dignified one this time, to the heart of the Westminster Government and to support the potentially huge rally in London on Saturday 20th June, 2015.
We encourage those attending to carry our much loved, unsullied and peaceful National flag of St. Piran in a true demonstration of ‘one and all’ and that as many as possible meet outside the Bank of England in London at 12 noon that day.
This event is being supported by the People’s Assembly, several Trades Unions and other staff associations, NGOs, politicians, celebrities, campaign groups and many others.
Despite careful Westminster management of the news agenda, thus far, social media is citizen driven and it is there where further details can be found.
Details of transport arrangements from Cornwall to London may be found on the following Facebook sites:



or by telephoning Stuart Cullimore of the Cornwall Anti Cuts Alliance on 01209 719525.
Details of the London demonstration may be found here:

Kernow bys vyken!
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Following on from confirmation that the Cornish people have been formally recognised as a National Minority and have now been included in the European Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, the following statement has been issued by Cornwall Councillor Bert Biscoe, Cabinet Member and Portfolio Holder for Transport as well as being a founder of the Cornish Cross Party Constitutional Convention and campaigner for Cornish recognition:
 
‘The recognition of the Cornish as a national minority is a further element of the foundations of future Cornwall. By openly and officially recognising the language, as, previously, the Government recognised the Cornish language, it means that those people who declare themselves to be Cornish can assume their rightful place in the diversity of cultures and identities which makes up modern Britain, and will in future have an equality of opportunity to access resources and rights which have, until now, been left out of policies, systems and best practice.’
 
Westminster Government announcement: Cornish granted minority status within the UK – Press releases – GOV.UK The Framework Convention: Council of Europe – ETS no. 157 – Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (This item compiled for Celtic News by Michael Chappell – Kernow Branch)

Yesterday (15th May 2012) a new French President was inaugurated in Paris, but whether this means a new French approach towards Brittany remains to be seen.

President Hollande has promised Bretons that he is prepared to consider the ratification of the European Charter for Regional and/or Minority Languages and increased powers for the Breton Regional Council, but as yet has made no commitment on whether he would support the reunification of Brittany.
These are some of the promises that have been made by other French politicians of the left before about Brittany, but is there any sign that President Hollande is different?
On the face of it Hollande comes from the same mould as other French politicians from the Jacobin tradition. He is a member of a mainstream political party and a career politician from a middle class Catholic family background. He is a graduate from the famous École Nationale d’Administration, which has given birth to many high flying civil servants and politicians, he is pro-European and of the left wing of the party. Like President Mitterand before him Hollande had some right wing influences in his early days, with his father standing in local elections on the extreme right, but he has in his mature years has developed into a nominal reformer advocate of French institutions.
Again like Mitterrand when he first became President, Hollande similarly knows that he has some way to go to make the Socialist Party popular with French voters and to help ‘unify’ a disaffected and in many ways disjointed French state. With a record number of voters in France voting for the French right wing – including in Brittany – in the first round of the presidential elections, Hollande is under no illusion that his first few months in office will be a difficult time. With legislative elections due in June 2012, Hollande must quickly win back popular acclaim for his party and the confidence of voters in order for the Socialists to stand any hope of making gains in the parliamentary elections. Without a majority in Parliament the new President is unlikely to be able to achieve the popularity for his party that was at one time enjoyed by President Mitterrand. Hollande may have won the Presidency, but it was only by a small margin. As the European media has discussed in recent days, the burden of responsibility has fallen squarely and fully on Hollande’s shoulders.
It can be expected that Hollande will have more pressing issues on his mind than the Breton language and regional government. With the Euro currency in free fall and the challenge of trying to persuade a stubborn Angela Merkel to back track on austerity measures put in place with the support of President Sarkozy, it seems unlikely that the President’s attention will turn to Brittany any time soon.
Again Breton’s are in the limbo position that they have been in before – waiting to see if French politicians will deliver on promises made before their election to office. How long the Bretons will have to wait to see if President Hollande will deliver on his promises is anyone’s guess, but if he is going to move in favour of Breton linguistic and democratic rights, it is not likely to be until after the June elections. It may nevertheless be worth people writing to President Hollande before the June elections, asking for confirmation from him that he will act in favour of the Breton cause. 
For comment or clarification on this news item in the first instance contact: Rhisiart Tal-e-bot, General Secretary, Celtic League Tel: 0044 (0)1209 319912 M: 0044 (0)7787318666. The General Secretary will determine the appropriate branch or General Council Officer to respond to your query.  
The Celtic League has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It works to promote cooperation between these countries and campaigns on a broad range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, monitors all military activity and focuses on socio-economic issues.

Yesterday (15th May 2012) a new French President was inaugurated in Paris, but whether this means a new French approach towards Brittany remains to be seen.

President Hollande has promised Bretons that he is prepared to consider the ratification of the European Charter for Regional and/or Minority Languages and increased powers for the Breton Regional Council, but as yet has made no commitment on whether he would support the reunification of Brittany.
These are some of the promises that have been made by other French politicians of the left before about Brittany, but is there any sign that President Hollande is different?
On the face of it Hollande comes from the same mould as other French politicians from the Jacobin tradition. He is a member of a mainstream political party and a career politician from a middle class Catholic family background. He is a graduate from the famous École Nationale d’Administration, which has given birth to many high flying civil servants and politicians, he is pro-European and of the left wing of the party. Like President Mitterand before him Hollande had some right wing influences in his early days, with his father standing in local elections on the extreme right, but he has in his mature years has developed into a nominal reformer advocate of French institutions.
Again like Mitterrand when he first became President, Hollande similarly knows that he has some way to go to make the Socialist Party popular with French voters and to help ‘unify’ a disaffected and in many ways disjointed French state. With a record number of voters in France voting for the French right wing – including in Brittany – in the first round of the presidential elections, Hollande is under no illusion that his first few months in office will be a difficult time. With legislative elections due in June 2012, Hollande must quickly win back popular acclaim for his party and the confidence of voters in order for the Socialists to stand any hope of making gains in the parliamentary elections. Without a majority in Parliament the new President is unlikely to be able to achieve the popularity for his party that was at one time enjoyed by President Mitterrand. Hollande may have won the Presidency, but it was only by a small margin. As the European media has discussed in recent days, the burden of responsibility has fallen squarely and fully on Hollande’s shoulders.
It can be expected that Hollande will have more pressing issues on his mind than the Breton language and regional government. With the Euro currency in free fall and the challenge of trying to persuade a stubborn Angela Merkel to back track on austerity measures put in place with the support of President Sarkozy, it seems unlikely that the President’s attention will turn to Brittany any time soon.
Again Breton’s are in the limbo position that they have been in before – waiting to see if French politicians will deliver on promises made before their election to office. How long the Bretons will have to wait to see if President Hollande will deliver on his promises is anyone’s guess, but if he is going to move in favour of Breton linguistic and democratic rights, it is not likely to be until after the June elections. It may nevertheless be worth people writing to President Hollande before the June elections, asking for confirmation from him that he will act in favour of the Breton cause. 
For comment or clarification on this news item in the first instance contact: Rhisiart Tal-e-bot, General Secretary, Celtic League Tel: 0044 (0)1209 319912 M: 0044 (0)7787318666. The General Secretary will determine the appropriate branch or General Council Officer to respond to your query.  
The Celtic League has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It works to promote cooperation between these countries and campaigns on a broad range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, monitors all military activity and focuses on socio-economic issues.

Yesterday (15th May 2012) a new French President was inaugurated in Paris, but whether this means a new French approach towards Brittany remains to be seen.

President Hollande has promised Bretons that he is prepared to consider the ratification of the European Charter for Regional and/or Minority Languages and increased powers for the Breton Regional Council, but as yet has made no commitment on whether he would support the reunification of Brittany.
These are some of the promises that have been made by other French politicians of the left before about Brittany, but is there any sign that President Hollande is different?
On the face of it Hollande comes from the same mould as other French politicians from the Jacobin tradition. He is a member of a mainstream political party and a career politician from a middle class Catholic family background. He is a graduate from the famous École Nationale d’Administration, which has given birth to many high flying civil servants and politicians, he is pro-European and of the left wing of the party. Like President Mitterand before him Hollande had some right wing influences in his early days, with his father standing in local elections on the extreme right, but he has in his mature years has developed into a nominal reformer advocate of French institutions.
Again like Mitterrand when he first became President, Hollande similarly knows that he has some way to go to make the Socialist Party popular with French voters and to help ‘unify’ a disaffected and in many ways disjointed French state. With a record number of voters in France voting for the French right wing – including in Brittany – in the first round of the presidential elections, Hollande is under no illusion that his first few months in office will be a difficult time. With legislative elections due in June 2012, Hollande must quickly win back popular acclaim for his party and the confidence of voters in order for the Socialists to stand any hope of making gains in the parliamentary elections. Without a majority in Parliament the new President is unlikely to be able to achieve the popularity for his party that was at one time enjoyed by President Mitterrand. Hollande may have won the Presidency, but it was only by a small margin. As the European media has discussed in recent days, the burden of responsibility has fallen squarely and fully on Hollande’s shoulders.
It can be expected that Hollande will have more pressing issues on his mind than the Breton language and regional government. With the Euro currency in free fall and the challenge of trying to persuade a stubborn Angela Merkel to back track on austerity measures put in place with the support of President Sarkozy, it seems unlikely that the President’s attention will turn to Brittany any time soon.
Again Breton’s are in the limbo position that they have been in before – waiting to see if French politicians will deliver on promises made before their election to office. How long the Bretons will have to wait to see if President Hollande will deliver on his promises is anyone’s guess, but if he is going to move in favour of Breton linguistic and democratic rights, it is not likely to be until after the June elections. It may nevertheless be worth people writing to President Hollande before the June elections, asking for confirmation from him that he will act in favour of the Breton cause. 
For comment or clarification on this news item in the first instance contact: Rhisiart Tal-e-bot, General Secretary, Celtic League Tel: 0044 (0)1209 319912 M: 0044 (0)7787318666. The General Secretary will determine the appropriate branch or General Council Officer to respond to your query.  
The Celtic League has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It works to promote cooperation between these countries and campaigns on a broad range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, monitors all military activity and focuses on socio-economic issues.
The French Parliament has voted in favour of a change in the law that could herald the reunification of Brittany. 
In the evening of Wednesday 21st December 2011 the French Parliament voted in favour of allowing residents of a department to hold a referendum without the agreement of other residents of the region. 
The change in the law could potentially mean that residents of the Loire Atlantique department, which forms part of the historic nation of Brittany and includes the historic Breton capital city of Naoned/Nantes, will be able to vote in favour of unification without having to convince others in the region to do the same. In 1941 the Loire Atlantique department was merged with the French Pays de la Loire region by the Fascist Vichy Government, which it has remained a part of ever since. 
It has been reported that there is widespread support among the people of the Loire Atlantique department for reunification with Brittany and similarly people in Brittany are in favour of this piece of their historic territory returning to them. Within the last decade in particular there has been a growing movement among activists to raise the profile of the campaign to reunify Brittany. In June this year a mass demonstration took place in Naoned that attracted 5000 people. The aim of the protesters was to apply pressure on the French presidential candidates, in time for elections in 2012, to come out in support of Breton unification. In June 2010 the Breton Regional Council voted in favour of a motion on the `territorial collective’ of Brittany, which recognized the Loire Atlantique department as part of the traditional territory of Brittany. 
Currently the Pays de la Loire region has approximately 3.5 million residents, with 1.3 million of these people inhabiting the Loire Atlantique Department. The new law could potentially mean that the 1.3 million residents of the Loire Atlantique Department can vote on whether they want their department to return to Breton control, without the approval of the other 2.2 million residents of the Pays de la Loire region. For the Loire Atlantique electorate to be able to decide whether their department is reunited with Brittany, without having to convince the rest of the Pays de la Loire region is a significant development, because traditionally the inhabitants of the Pays de la Loire region outside of the Loire Atlantique Department have been against reunification. 
Naoned is an economically strong region in its own right and currently the capital of the Pays de la Loire region. The president of the Pays de la Loire region, who is one of the biggest opponents of reunification, said he was “surprised” by the vote. A close advisor to French president Nicolas Sarkozy, Franck Louvrier, said he was pleased by the draft amendment, arguing that the idea of giving the Loire Atlantique Department back to Brittany was “decidedly favourable” and welcomed the development, which he said was a democratic move. 
The draft text of the bill will now need to go before the French parliament’s upper house, the Senate, for approval. 
For comment or clarification on this news item in the first instance contact: Rhisiart Tal-e-bot, General Secretary, Celtic League: Tel: 0044 (0)1209 319912 M: 0044 (0)7787318666 gensec@celticleague.net The General Secretary will determine the appropriate branch or General Council Officer to respond to your query. 
The Celtic League has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It works to promote cooperation between these countries and campaigns on a broad range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, monitors all military activity and focuses on socio-economic issues.  Website here and news group here
The French Parliament has voted in favour of a change in the law that could herald the reunification of Brittany. 
In the evening of Wednesday 21st December 2011 the French Parliament voted in favour of allowing residents of a department to hold a referendum without the agreement of other residents of the region. 
The change in the law could potentially mean that residents of the Loire Atlantique department, which forms part of the historic nation of Brittany and includes the historic Breton capital city of Naoned/Nantes, will be able to vote in favour of unification without having to convince others in the region to do the same. In 1941 the Loire Atlantique department was merged with the French Pays de la Loire region by the Fascist Vichy Government, which it has remained a part of ever since. 
It has been reported that there is widespread support among the people of the Loire Atlantique department for reunification with Brittany and similarly people in Brittany are in favour of this piece of their historic territory returning to them. Within the last decade in particular there has been a growing movement among activists to raise the profile of the campaign to reunify Brittany. In June this year a mass demonstration took place in Naoned that attracted 5000 people. The aim of the protesters was to apply pressure on the French presidential candidates, in time for elections in 2012, to come out in support of Breton unification. In June 2010 the Breton Regional Council voted in favour of a motion on the `territorial collective’ of Brittany, which recognized the Loire Atlantique department as part of the traditional territory of Brittany. 
Currently the Pays de la Loire region has approximately 3.5 million residents, with 1.3 million of these people inhabiting the Loire Atlantique Department. The new law could potentially mean that the 1.3 million residents of the Loire Atlantique Department can vote on whether they want their department to return to Breton control, without the approval of the other 2.2 million residents of the Pays de la Loire region. For the Loire Atlantique electorate to be able to decide whether their department is reunited with Brittany, without having to convince the rest of the Pays de la Loire region is a significant development, because traditionally the inhabitants of the Pays de la Loire region outside of the Loire Atlantique Department have been against reunification. 
Naoned is an economically strong region in its own right and currently the capital of the Pays de la Loire region. The president of the Pays de la Loire region, who is one of the biggest opponents of reunification, said he was “surprised” by the vote. A close advisor to French president Nicolas Sarkozy, Franck Louvrier, said he was pleased by the draft amendment, arguing that the idea of giving the Loire Atlantique Department back to Brittany was “decidedly favourable” and welcomed the development, which he said was a democratic move. 
The draft text of the bill will now need to go before the French parliament’s upper house, the Senate, for approval. 
For comment or clarification on this news item in the first instance contact: Rhisiart Tal-e-bot, General Secretary, Celtic League: Tel: 0044 (0)1209 319912 M: 0044 (0)7787318666 gensec@celticleague.net The General Secretary will determine the appropriate branch or General Council Officer to respond to your query. 
The Celtic League has branches in the six Celtic Countries. It works to promote cooperation between these countries and campaigns on a broad range of political, cultural and environmental matters. It highlights human rights abuse, monitors all military activity and focuses on socio-economic issues.  Website here and news group here