Archive for the ‘breton culture’ Category

An nice Cornish translation here of Me zo ganet e kreiz ar mor (I was born within the sea / among the waves) original written by  Jean-Pierre Calloc’h

The Breton original can be heard sung here below.
Here’s one I just bought in from Coop Breizh that looks to be full of fascinating stuff for those interested in Brittany, Cornwall and the relations that exist between our two countries.
Here’s one I just bought in from Coop Breizh that looks to be full of fascinating stuff for those interested in Brittany, Cornwall and the relations that exist between our two countries.
For anybody interested in hearing some spoken Breton (Brezhoneg) then below you’ll find a pretty dam good example. 
Breton is the closet relative of the Cornish language and equally shares much with Welsh. I believe 80% of basic vocabulary is shared between Cornish and Breton. 
If you’d like to learn Breton then this blog has plenty of links to useful sites. Of course speaking French will help in accessing the vast majority of learning materials. However, that being said, some organisations have translated their websites into English. Equally, in my experience, the level of spoken English amongst Breton language trainers is above that of the ‘French’ average.
Finally, if you are an anglophone and you want to learn some Breton don’t hesitate to contact me for some advice.
For anybody interested in hearing some spoken Breton (Brezhoneg) then below you’ll find a pretty dam good example. 
Breton is the closet relative of the Cornish language and equally shares much with Welsh. I believe 80% of basic vocabulary is shared between Cornish and Breton. 
If you’d like to learn Breton then this blog has plenty of links to useful sites. Of course speaking French will help in accessing the vast majority of learning materials. However, that being said, some organisations have translated their websites into English. Equally, in my experience, the level of spoken English amongst Breton language trainers is above that of the ‘French’ average.
Finally, if you are an anglophone and you want to learn some Breton don’t hesitate to contact me for some advice.
Now that’s multicultural for you. An interview in a national minority language (Breton) about a traditional music event with a couple of black musicians wiping the floor with the competition in the background. 
Not the kind of thing you’d find on the websites of the various antifascist yet state-nationalist organisations that seem to be two-a-penny in the UK, France, Spain etc. 
In their defence of the old imperialist states – institutionally intolerant of their original national minorities as well as any other minority group that menaces the establishments hold on power – these anti-racist organisations seem at times more part of the problem than any kind of solution.