Archive for the ‘BBC’ Category

On the face of it Cornwall Reports seems to be a very interesting idea but if I have a doubt it’s due to the principle name attached to the project. My concerns about Graham Smith have been spelt out elsewhere (click here), they don’t need to be repeated here.
What can be added however is a little detail that came to mind on reading his name. Once, in a pique with Mebyon Kernow, Smith, on his impartial BBC blog, quoted George Orwell on nationalism – the objective being undoubtedly to paint MK as evil nationalists. The irony! An employee of a state-controlled media mouthpiece quoting George ‘Big Brother‘ Orwell in an attack on a small political movement that defends the rights of a dissenting minority. When this was pointed out on his blog no response was forthcoming. 
A thought for the day: Perhaps if Mr Smith, the Labour party and a long list of others had spent more of their time examining and taking apart the arguments of the Anglo-British nationalist and xenophobic UKIP rather than focusing their attention on the likes of MK, Plaid and the SNP (competitors with Labour) we wouldn’t be in the mess we are today.
Anyway, what they have to say for themselves can be found below. Should they be awarded the benefit of the doubt? I suppose so.
Cornwall Reports is a project to reinvent journalism.  It is part of a mission to re-establish the primacy of rationalism and objective facts, using technology to finance the gathering and dissemination of news.  Like the pamphleteers of the 17th and 18th centuries, Cornwall Reports seeks to make a fundamental contribution to democracy.

The premise is that as technology lowers production costs, so the value of media reduces, finally, to that of its content alone.  The ambition of Cornwall Reports is to eventually produce content which is financed entirely by its consumers.  In short, you will pay for only what you read, without the hidden costs of adverts, pop-ups, surveys and clickbait. Cornwall Reports is just journalism, pure and simple.

In the 21st century, the Cornwall Reports project will have to challenge the might of global publishing giants such as Facebook and Google – which today effectively act as gatekeepers to almost every digital word read online.  Cornwall Reports must therefore fight an asymmetrical war in which size alone does not matter.

The business plan calls for Cornwall Reports to build a brand identity free of advertising (the growing prevalence of ad-blocking software already poses a severe threat to conventional online news media) and ultimately to make its content invisible to search engines.

Cornwall Reports becomes viable as an ad-free online newspaper once it has 1,000 subscribers.  The sooner that day comes, the better – we estimate about one year.  If you would be willing to be among the founding subscribers, and would like to take advantage of the rewards that includes, then please email theboss@cornwallreports.co.uk and we will get in touch.

To: Department for Culture, Media and Sport 

Give Cornish language and culture the equal status, recognition, respect and prominence in public service broadcasting that it deserves. 
We believe the Cornish should have equal status with the other indigenous languages and cultures of Britain.

We want BBC Kernow | Cornwall to sit in it’s rightful place alongside BBC Cymru and BBC Alba on the iPlayer. 

We want appropriate commissioning and editorial processes to be established within the remit of the BBC Royal Charter from 2017 to develop and grow Cornish language and cultural programming.
Why is this important? 
Every culture should have their own voice represented in the world’s media, particularly in public service broadcasting. 
In 2003 the Cornish language (Kernewek) received official recognition under the European Charter for the Protection of Regional or Minority Languages. 
In 2014 the Cornish were granted protected national minority status under the Council of Europe Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. 
This means the Cornish have the same recognition as the Welsh, Scots and Northern Irish. 
Tweet #BBCKernow #yourBBC 
Please sign this petition to pledge your support for the establishment of BBC Kernow. 
How it will be delivered 
This petition will be delivered in person to Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. 
Sign the petition here:  BBC KERNOW
“I am a multiculturalist. In England, on the whole, when we talk about multiculturalism, we tend to talk about black people, Asian people and people who have brought their cultures here, and sometimes we forget that there are local cultures which are very different to English mainstream culture and literature. So when I come to Wales, I treat Wales like a different country with a culture and language of its own. And if Wales is a part of Britain, then that culture is an important part of Britain – as important as Jamaican culture, Trinidadian culture or Indian culture for example.

That’s why I’ve always said that the Welsh language should be taught in schools in England. Hindi, Chinese and French are taught, so why not Welsh? And why not Cornish? They’re part of our culture, and I know of people in England who don’t know that people in Wales speak Welsh, or that there’s a Scottish language.” – Dr Benjamin Zephaniah
“Dwi’n berson aml-ddiwylliannol. Yn Lloegr, yn gyffredinol, pan rydan ni’n trafod amlddiwylliannaeth rydan ni’n cyfeirio at bobl du, pobl Asiaidd a phobl eraill sydd wedi dod â’u diwylliannau yma, a rydan ni’n anghofio weithiau bod ‘na ddiwylliannau lleol sydd yn wahanol iawn i ddiwylliant a llenyddiaeth prif ffrwd Saesneg. Felly pan dwi’n dod i Gymru, dwi’n trin Cymru fel gwlad wahanol gyda’i hiaith a’i diwylliant ei hun. Ac os yw Cymru yn rhan o Brydain, yna mae’i diwylliant yn rhan bwysig o Brydain hefyd – yr un mor bwysig â diwylliant Jamaica, Trinidad neu India er enghraifft.

Dyna’r rheswm dwi’n dweud y dylai’r iaith Gymraeg gael ei dysgu mewn ysgolion yn Lloegr. Mae Hindi, Tsieinëeg a Ffrangeg yn cael eu dysgu, felly pam ddim Cymraeg? A pham ddim Cernyweg? Maen nhw’n rhan o’n diwylliant, a dwi’n gwybod am bobl yn Lloegr sydd ddim hyd yn oed yn gwybod bod pobl yng Nghymru yn siarad Cymraeg, neu fod ‘na iaith Gaeleg yn yr Alban.” – Dr Benjamin Zephaniah

The full article in Welsh and English can be found here: What the English could learn from the Eisteddfod – BBC Cymru Fyw

Fine sentiments from Dr Zephaniah and I can only hope the BBC in Cornwall, who at times appear rabidly anti-Cornish, take note. But as long as unhealthy relations abound between LibLabCon politicians and BBC journalists I won’t hold my breath.

  
The BBC Trust has denied MK’s call for a Party Election Broadcast and and the mainstream parties are spending massively in the St Austell and Newquay seat. In 2010 – between January 1st 2010 and polling day on May 6th – the Conservative candidate spent £40,968, while the Liberal Democrat candidate spent £33,852. It is also the case that in the period leading up to 2010, they also spent many tens of thousands of pounds. Even minor UK parties such as the Greens and Ukip are benefiting from an increased media attention.  Help redress the balance by putting your hands in your pockets for Dick Cole’s campaign in St Austell and Newquay. Click here to give Cornwall a voice: Dick Cole (Mebyon Kernow) for St Austell.

Could the BBC be clear about Cornwall?

Posted: November 5, 2014 in BBC
UK devolution: Could Cornwall be independent? Could the BBC, one day, explain clearly that the Cornish want devolution not independence?  
Greater self-determination, autonomy or devolution, call it what you will, the vast majority of Cornish campaigners and group are not calling for Cornish independence from the United Kingdom. So why then does the BBC wish to misrepresent us as all fervent separatists?
THE BIGGER THE LIE – Media Bias in the Scottish Independence Referendum 

Of course this will come as no surprise to Cornish campaigners who have long been aware of the unhealthy links between the English nationalist Labour party and the BBC in Cornwall.
Perhaps, after ferreting around in some of my posts on English Regionalism, the BBC journalist Nick Tarver felt inspired to write this: Could areas of England leave the UK?

That’s as positive as I’m going to get about the article I’m afraid. A torn flag, the menace of secession from the UK, stereotypes in lashings and a total lack of any substantive discussion on decentralisation, federalism or greater local democracy leaves me wondering what exactly is Nick Tarver trying to achieve?

Mr Tarver thinks it appropriate to use a photo of a Cornish pasty for an article that treats our desire for greater self-determination. Okay, could I suggest then a picture of a haggis for the Scottish referendum, a plate of curry for an article touching on Indian political issues and a big fat joint for anything he might write about Jamaican republicanism. With BBC employees free to use such crude stereotypes at least the age old we-know-what’s-best attitude that emanates from the shrivelled heart of empire would be less timid about pronouncing its name.

Ridicule is indeed a potent political weapon. Does this explain then why one of the most notable developments in English regionalism in recent times is strikingly absent from the article? Either Mr Tarver is completely incompetent or he has deliberately decided to exclude any mention of the Hannah Mitchell Foundation. Another example of that old connivance between Labour and the BBC? A Labour project being lampooned with stereotypes whilst being portrayed as secessionist under a torn St Georges flag on a BBC website! No, that would never do would it.
Am I lacking a sense of humour? Perhaps, but more importantly is the BBC lacking decent unbiased journalists? Which problem do you think is more important?

To complain click here: Complain on line.